10 REASONS TO VISIT BATH

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Known for its natural hot springs and its Georgian architecture, the small town of Bath is a great place to take a break from everyday routine while rejuvenating yourself. If this hasn’t convinced you yet, here are 10 reasons to go and visit this treasure in Somerset county.

Bath

Bath

The Roman Baths

Bath: Roman baths

Bath: Roman baths

Voted as Britain’s most romantic buildings, the Roman Baths and the Temple of Sulis Minerva consist in one of Bath’s biggest attraction. Indeed, with a constant temperature of 46.5 °C and water gushing from a depth of 10000 ft at a rate of 275 gallons a day, it is easy to understand the visitor’s fascination for this natural phenomenon. After observing from the terrace the Great Bath surrounded by Victorian statutes of Roman emperors along with British governors, you will be able to visit the temple where people came to worship the goddess Sulis Minerva, while also discovering the history of Roman Britain, and in particular of the town Aqua Sulis.

For more information:

Address: Stall Street, Bath, BA1 1LZ

Contact: 01225 477 785

Thermae Bath Spa

Bath: Thermae Bath spa

Bath: Thermae Bath spa

While bathing in the Roman Baths is off-limits, you can experience the natural waters and their curative properties at Thermae Bath Spa. With two swimming pools, steam rooms and spa treatments, you will be able to enjoy much more than just the warm waters (usually around 33.5°C). One of the swimming pool is located on top of the building, offering a panoramic view over the city of Bath and its surroundings. What can be better than admiring the sun going down on the skyline while relaxing in a Jacuzzi?

If you are planning a visit, make sure to avoid Saturdays and Sundays afternoon, as it gets pretty busy. However, Sunday mornings and most weekdays tend to be quieter, offering the ultimate Spa experience.

For more information:

Address: Hot Bath Street, BA1 1SJ

Contact: 01 225 331 234

The Royal Crescent

Bath: Royal Crescent

Bath: Royal Crescent

Bath architecture is definitely a must-see, and this half-ellipse (despite the name, it is not a crescent) is one of the most impressive features of the city. Built during the 18th century by John Wood the Younger, the 30 houses of this street are all perfectly symmetrical, identical and not even close to changing, as owners are only allowed to adjust the interior to their taste. To discover this street from the inside, you can either have a look into The Royal Crescent Hotel while enjoying an afternoon tea in this luxurious and peaceful atmosphere, or explore N°1 Royal Crescent, completely furnished with historical objects and pictures.

For more information:

The Royal Crescent Hotel: http://www.royalcrescent.co.uk/

N°1 Royal Crescent: http://no1royalcrescent.org.uk/

The Circus

Bath: The Circus

Bath: The Circus

Competing with the Royal Crescent, the Circus is the second architectural must-see of Bath. Designed, as the name indicates, in a circle shape, it is made of 33 houses built in a circle around a massive tree, offering a truly unique sight. Inspired by the Colosseum, the architecture is a true representation of the classical Roman style in the middle of a Georgian design and an English atmosphere. If you take a closer look, you will also be able to see emblems carved on each of the house’s façade, including serpents, acorns, nautical or masonic symbols. Now it’s only up to you to visit both the Royal Crescent and the Circus and decide which one you prefer the most.

Victoria Park

Bath: Victoria Park

Bath: Victoria Park

Close to the Royal Crescent and the Circus sits the large and scenic Victoria Park. Opened in 1830, the park has been customized with something to please everyone, from children to adults. Indeed, with a boating pond, a golf course, a botanical garden and occasional open-air concerts, this park will be the perfect location to enjoy the gentle weather while admiring the view over Bath and its surroundings. More than just for entertainment, you can also learn a bit more about Bath’s history by strolling around the park and visiting the beautiful Temple of Minerva or the Obelisk of the Victoria Majority Monument.

 The Holburne Museum

Bath: Holburne Museum

Bath: Holburne Museum

Re-opened in 2011 after refurbishment, the Holburne Museum’s building itself provides a step back in time through its grandiose architecture and its perfectly symmetrical façade. Inside, a selection of masterpieces awaits, with paintings from Gainsborough, Reynolds and Stubbs among others, along with Renaissance treasures; and that is only the first floor. Climbing the stairs and reaching the ballroom will transport you back to the 18th century, with silver and china laid out like it would be for a banquet; you can also discover a collection of pieces from this period, including porcelains, paintings and sculptures. The top floor focuses more on the city’s history through paintings dating back from the Britain’s Golden Age.

For more information:

Address: Great Pulteney Street, Bathwick, Bath, BA2 4DB

Contact: +44 (0) 1225 388588

Pulteney Bridge

Bath: Pulteney Bridge

Bath: Pulteney Bridge

Built in 1773 and inspired by Florence’s Ponte Vecchio and Venice’s Ponte di Rialto, Pulteney Bridge is one of the most photographed places in Bath thanks to its beautiful architecture. It is especially famous for being one of the four bridges in the world with two ranges of shops and restaurants on each side of the bridge.

There are two ways to experience it. One is getting a view of the bridge over the Avon River and its weir; the other is gazing from the inside of one of the shop or restaurants on the south side.

Jane Austen Centre

Bath: Jane Austen Centre

Bath: Jane Austen Centre

If you want to discover Bath under a completely different angle, you might want to try and experience the city and the way of life during the Regency times as described in Jane Austen’s novels. Indeed, Bath was more than Jane Austen’s home for 5 years of her life; it was also used as backdrop for two of her novels: Northanger Abbey and Persuasion. The Jane Austen Centre offers a snapshot back into 18th century by showcasing fashion, food and culture of that era. Want to get into the spirit a bit more? Try out some of the costumes. With bonnet, top hats, dresses and shawls you could re-enact some of your favorite narrations.

For more information:

Address: 40 Gay Street, Bath BA1 2NT

Contact: (+44) 01225 443000

Bath Abbey

Bath Abbey

Bath Abbey

Whether you simply want to appreciate the architecture, listen to the chorus’ singing or contemplate the magnificence of the abbey, its stained glass windows and its columns, there is definitely a reason for you to have a look inside and wander around. While it was rebuild in 1499 by Bishop Oliver King, the site has been occupied by churches since 757 AD; that makes Bath Abbey the last of the great medieval churches of England. Designed following one of Bishop Oliver King’s dream, the abbey’s façade is adorned by angels climbing up and down a ladder; this has now become one of the prime attractions of this church.

Bath Skyline Walk

Bath Skyline Walk

Bath Skyline Walk

Exiting Bath’s city centre will enable you to get a better view over the entire city and its surrounding. The Bath Skyline Walk is a 6 miles (9.6km) long route starting on the eastern part of the city centre. From there it will take you across an Iron Age hill fort, to hidden valleys and woodlands, for a unique experience. Indeed, on the way you will not only get to see an extensive view over Bath, especially from Little Solsbury Hill, but you will also have the opportunity to discover other sites, such as the Palladian Bridge, renowned for their beautiful architecture and only surrounded by the nature.

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